Credit by A tiger walks past the camera trap survey ©KWCI
Last Remaining Wilderness: Camera Trap in Burma Captured Rare Wildlife Animals
NATURE Myanmar

Last Remaining Wilderness: Camera Trap in Burma Captured Rare Wildlife Animals

A camera trap surveys revealed a wealth of rare wildlife including Elephants, Leopards, Tigers and etc.  Using six camera traps surveys, found at least 31 mammals, which more than half of them are near threatened, vulnerable to extinction and endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List.

The survey located in the hill forest of Northern Karen State, Burma was conducted by The Karen Wildlife Conservation Initiative (KWCI) with the support of World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and other partners. “It is incredibly rare to find such rich and diverse wildlife anywhere in the world today but certainly in Southeast Asia.”  said Clare Campbell, Director of Wildlife Asia, the Australian conservation NGO that coordinates the KWCI. “Thanks to the long-standing conservation efforts of the Karen people this area is a refuge for the last tigers in the region, Asian elephants and so much more,”  

Here are the pictures of animals caught by the camera trap surveys :

An elephant captured moving through the forest  (KWCI)
An elephant captured moving through the forest (©KWCI )
Asian golden cat  (KWCI)
Asian golden cat (©KWCI )
A pair of leopard  (KWCI)
A pair of leopard (©KWCI )

According to the FAO Global Forest Resource Assessment, 2015, Myanmar had the world’s third highest annual net loss of forest area between 2010–2015, behind only Brazil and Indonesia.

A Serow looks back at the camera  (KWCI)
A Sambar  (©KWCI )
An assam macaques carries its baby  (KWCI)
An assam macaques carries its baby (©KWCI )

 “The illegal wildlife trade is rapidly emptying Myanmar’s forests and proximity to the infamous Golden Triangle Region makes it particularly vulnerable,” said Nick Cox, WWF-Myanmar Conservation Director. “The illegal wildlife markets in Myanmar’s cities and along all its borders must be closed, and well-trained rangers are needed on the ground if Myanmar is to keep its incredible wildlife.”

Sambar is pictured  (KWCI)
Gaur  is pictured as its passing by the camera   (©KWCI I)
A group of dholes, Asiatic wild dogs  (KWCI)
A group of dholes, Asiatic wild dogs (©KWCI )
A clouded leopard  (KWCI)
A clouded leopard (©KWCI )

Damian Flemming, WWF’s director of international programme support said that it was hugely encouraging to find the wealth of unaccounted life, as it was a great example of local people acting as invaluable stewards of their environment.


Source : telegraph.co.uk || scotlandcorrespondent.com || wwf.panda.org 

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